Journal Writing Prompts for the Christmas Season

Do you want to add some Christmas entries to your journal? Christmas is a magical time of year. Writing about your current and past Christmas seasons is a great way to preserve your memories. If you need inspiration, check out the following journal writing prompts for the Christmas season.

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  1. How do you plan to spend the holiday season?
  2. Create a holiday bucket list. Add at least 10 activities.
  3. Describe what Christmas means to you. Go into details.  
  4. What Christmas traditions did you have growing up?
  5. Do you still incorporate any of those traditions with your family or friends today? Why?
  6. What new Christmas activities do you plan to try this year? Why?
  7. What is your favorite Christmas memory from childhood?
  8. What is your favorite Christmas memory as an adult?
  9. What do you feel was your worse Christmas? Why?
  10. Write a letter to Santa Claus. Yes, you as an adult write a letter to Santa.
  11. What is your favorite Christmas song? Why?
  12. What is your favorite Christmas show? Why?
  13. Write an A-to-Z list of everything Christmas-related. It’s harder than you think.
  14. How do you plan to give back to the community this Christmas?
  15. I love the holiday season because______________________. Free write your answer for at least 15 minutes.
  16. What was your best Christmas gift as a child? As an adult?
  17. If you were granted 3 wishes for Christmas, what would you pick? Why?
  18. Have you ever peeked at a Christmas gift for you as a child? Or an adult? What was the gift?
  19. What are you most thankful for this Christmas season?
  20. If you could give a Christmas gift to your community, what would you pick?
  21. Today is the first official day of winter. How does winter add to the Christmas season?
  22. Do you attend church services regularly or attend Christmas related services? How does your spiritual beliefs help you celebrate the Christmas season?
  23. What are you hoping to see over the next couple of days when celebrating Christmas?
  24. Christmas Eve! What do you plan to do?
  25. Merry Christmas! Write about your entire day.
  26. Did you go shopping for the day after Christmas bargains? Or spend the day just relaxing?
  27. Write about your best and worst New Year’s Eve celebrations.
  28. As a child, did you celebrate New Year’s Eve as a family? What did you do?
  29. Write about your Christmas season. List the highs and lows.
  30. Write about 2021.
  31. Happy New Year’s Eve! What are you plans?  

25 Days of Christmas: Drawing Prompts

December ushers in a month-long season of Christmas cheer. Are you looking to put extra merriment in the holiday season? Drawing is a superb creative outlet to add to this magical time of year.  

25 Drawing Prompts for Christmas

Christmas tree and gifts
  1. Self-Portrait with a Christmas Theme
  2. Christmas Tree
  3. Christmas Gifts, Wrapping Paper, Ribbons, & Bows
  4. Christmas Cards
  5. Santa & Mrs. Claus
  6. Elves
  7. North Pole & Santa’s Workshop
  8. Santa’s Sleigh & Reindeer (Don’t forget Rudolph)
  9. The Grinch
  10. Christmas Ornaments & Tree Topper
  11. Christmas Stockings
  12. Mistle Toe
  13. Nativity
  14. Mary, Joseph, & Baby Jesus
  15. Christmas Star
  16. Angels
  17. Letters to Santa
  18. Gingerbread House
  19. Christmas Sweater
  20. Candy Cane and Christmas Sweets
  21. Christmas Bells
  22. Christmas Wreath
  23. Nutcracker
  24. Peace On Earth
  25. Merry Christmas

Get the most out of your Christmas drawing prompts by turning your creations into ornaments. Consider using small notecards which can easily be laminated. Next, punch a hole in the top to add ribbon to hang on your Christmas tree.

Rebecca Reviewed It: Village of Ashley Country Christmas

Colorful lights, Santa & Mrs. Claus, flame-throwing juggler, Christmas music, and a roaring steam engine, what else do you need on a chilly evening? I went to watch the beautiful Pere Marquette aka the Polar Express thunder into Ashley, Michigan. Carrying passengers to visit a small town completely decked out for Christmas fun.

Where: The train comes from Owosso to arrive in the small Village of Ashley, Michigan. The passengers enjoy about a 1 hour 15-minute ride, stay in Ashley for a couple of hours, then return to Owosso. The public is welcome to enjoy the small town and view the train coming into town.

When: The Polar Express comes into town twice a day every weekend until Christmas.

This is the official pamphlet from the Village of Ashley Country Christmas 2021.

What You View: The town is set up with a variety of little Christmas shops, food, hot cocoa, and activities for the entire family to enjoy. For example Penny Lane has handcrafted gifts to wear. The handmade hats are beautiful and warm.

The lists of little shops and activities within in the town.

Will I Go Again? Most definitely, yes. I would love to see the train arrive after a heavy snowfall. Hopefully Mother Nature and my schedule allow me to do it. Who knows maybe one of these times, I will actually ride the train.

12 Kid-Friendly Thanksgiving Shows

Your Thanksgiving feast is history. Now the time is right to just relax and watch television. Are you looking for a kid-friendly show to watch on Thanksgiving? Check out the following list. Please note: As an Amazon affiliate I earn income from qualifying purchases.

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  1. A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (1973)
  2. Garfield’s Thanksgiving (1989)
  3. An Arthur Thanksgiving
  4. Jim Henson’s Turkey Hollow (2015)
  5. Turkey Town: A Thanksgiving Party (2018)
  6. Dora the Explorer: Dora’s Thanksgiving Parade (2000)
  7. Alvin and the Chipmunks: Alvin’s Thanksgiving Celebration (2008)
  8. Winnie the Pooh: Seasons of Giving (1999)
  9. Free Birds (2013)
  10. A Looney Tunes Thanksgiving (2016)
  11. Addams Family Values
  12. Beethoven (1993)

Or you could always start the Christmas season early. Watch classic favorites: Miracle on 34th Street, Frosty the Snowman, A Charlie Brown Christmas, or Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

Thanksgiving Traditions to Start This Year

Thanksgiving is almost here! Are you looking for a new Thanksgiving tradition to start this year? Or perhaps expand on your existing traditions. Making memories is the best part of the holiday season. If you are searching for new Thanksgiving traditions to start this year, check out the following list.

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  1. Decorate: Get crafty. Decorate as a family project. Thanksgiving decoration ideas include placements, name holders, and centerpieces.
  2. Being Grateful: When sitting around the dinner table, ask your family and friends, why are you grateful this year? If you do not want to say your reason out loud, write on a pumpkin. Or jot your message down on precut leaves to hang on a tree.
  3.  Saying Grace: Start a new tradition of praying before you and your family eat Thanksgiving dinner.
  4. Get Outdoors: Spend some time outdoors. Play football, go for a hike, go on a nature walk, or be part of a fun run (Turkey Trot).
  5. Bake Together: Make the meal together as a family. Dig out an old family recipe to make. Tell a story about the person who originally made the recipe.
  6. Volunteer as a Family: Many organizations cater to the homeless on Thanksgiving. Volunteer as a family to homeless shelter, soup kitchen, or other community organization.
  7. Attend a Thanksgiving Parade: Parades are popular on Thanksgiving. If you cannot attend one in person, watch one a television.
  8. Family Photos: Before everyone gets too tired from eating all that delicious turkey, take family photos.
  9. Make Memory Cards: Ask each person to write a Thanksgiving memory. Memory cards are an easy way to learn about your family history.
  10. Record Family Stories: Use your cell phone to record family stories. Or ask each person to tell you the best part of the day.
  11. Board Games: After clearing the table, pull out board games. Old favorites, Monopoly, Life, or Sorry, are always a wonderful way to engage your family. 
  12. Watch Football: Get comfortable after the big meal and watch your favorite team.
  13. Watch A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving: Who cannot resist Snoopy and the gang? Or you could kick off the Christmas season by watching A Miracle on 34th Street.
  14. Thanksgiving Journal: After everyone is asleep or watching television, take a moment to write in your journal about Thanksgiving 2021.

Happy Thanksgiving! What tradition will you start this year?

30 Thanksgiving Photo Prompts

Are you hosting a big Thanksgiving? Or traveling to a relatives’ house for the long 4-day weekend? Thanksgiving is a great time to get impromptu photos. If you need inspiration, check out the following photo prompts for Thanksgiving.

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  1. Thanksgiving sunrise or sunset
  2. Cooking the meal
  3. Cooked turkey or main dish
  4. The side dishes
  5. Family
  6. Friends
  7. Pie and desserts
  8. Falling leaves
  9. The table setting
  10. The table with food (or food area)
  11. Warm colors
  12. Football
  13. Happiness
  14. Grateful
  15. Prayer
  16. Candles
  17. Out your kitchen window
  18. Celebration
  19. After Dinner
  20. Blessings
  21. On the road
  22. Destination
  23. Accommodations
  24. Back home
  25. Special moment
  26. Love
  27. Adventure
  28. Nature
  29. Thanksgiving Day selfie
  30. In the moment
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Happy Thanksgiving!

The Best Photos to Take on Thanksgiving

Yes, Thanksgiving comes every year. Unfortunately, over time, those who gather at your table may no longer be here to celebrate. Use your camera or cell phone to preserve your holiday memories with photographs.

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Photos to Take for the Best Thanksgiving Memories

Are you ready to capture the laughs, the food, and the joy of Thanksgiving? Get snapping.

Getting Ready

Setting up the table, preparing the kids’ table, decorating, or dressing up for the day are all special moments Snap a few photos during this busy time. The process of getting ready is a major part of Thanksgiving.

Cooking

A large meal usually means more than one person in the kitchen. Capturing the laughs that occur during the preparation of a Thanksgiving feast is always a special memory.

Group Photos

If everyone arrives early, get group photos before the dinner. Spills and dropped food easily stain the best apparel. A large family gathering means a person is always available to watch the kitchen while group photos are being done. For a photo of the entire family use your self-timer on your camera or bribe a neighbor with pumpkin pie to take a quick photo.

Dinner Time

Before everyone digs into the delicious meal, snap a photo of the dinner table. Get the full table with all the decorations, place settings, and the entire food spread. Next, take a photo of everyone coming to the table. And finally, one of everyone sitting around the Thanksgiving table.

If prayer is part of the feast, you have two options. One, skip the photo entirely. Or two, set your camera on self-timer to get a picture of everyone in prayer.

Outdoor Time

Do you play football or hike as a family on Thanksgiving? As long as someone is watching the kitchen, grab your camera and head outdoors to take photos.

Candid and Creativity

Posed photos are great but candid shots are extra special. Photos of your aunt laughing too hard at a silly joke or your grandfather sharing a story with the children invoke emotion. The photos will always be a lasting memory.

 Do not be afraid to try different angles, use natural light, or a zoom lens. Try to capture what you are thankful for at Thanksgiving.

Enjoy your day! Happy Thanksgiving!

50 Quotes for Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is almost here. Are you looking to add quotes to your social media posts, company email, or your bulletin board at work? The following quotes are great for remembering Thanksgiving.

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  1. “Thanksgiving is a time of togetherness and gratitude.” – Nigel Hamilton
  2. “In November, people are good to each other. They carry pies to each other’s homes and talk by crackling woodstoves, sipping mellow cider. They travel very far on a special November day just to share a meal with one another and to give thanks for their many blessings.” — Cynthia Rylant
  3. “I awoke this morning with devout thanksgiving for my friends, the old and the new.”—Ralph Waldo Emerson.
  4. “We must find time to stop and thank the people who make a difference in our lives.” – John F. Kennedy
  5. “Gratitude can transform common days into thanksgivings, turn routine jobs into joy, and change ordinary opportunities into blessings.” — William Arthur Ward
  6. “If you think Independence Day is America’s defining holiday, think again. Thanksgiving deserves that title, hands-down.”—Tony Snow.
  7. “Not what we say about our blessings, but how we use them, is the true measure of our thanksgiving.” – W. T. Purkiser
  8. “Thanksgiving, man. Not a good day to be my pants.” — Kevin James
  9. “Gratitude is the inward feeling of kindness received. Thankfulness is the natural impulse to express that feeling. Thanksgiving is the following of that impulse.”—Henry Van Dyke
  10. “The more we express thanks, the more gratitude we feel. The more gratitude we feel, the more we express thanks. It’s circular, and it leads to a happier life.”—Steve Goodier
  11. “Thanksgiving just gets me all warm and tingly and all kinds of wonderful inside.” – Willard Scott
  12. “I started out giving thanks for small things, and the more thankful I became, the more my bounty increased.” — Oprah Winfrey
  13. “Thanksgiving Day is a good day to recommit our energies to giving thanks and just giving.”—Amy Grant
  14. “Although Thanksgiving comes but once a year, every day should be a day of Thanks.” -Monique Hammond
  15. “To give thanks in solitude is enough. Thanksgiving has wings and goes where it must go. Your prayer knows much more about it than you do.”—Victor Hugo
  16. “I am grateful for what I am and have. My thanksgiving is perpetual.” — Henry David Thoreau
  17. “I have a lot to be thankful for. I am healthy, happy and I am loved.”—Reba McEntire
  18. “Thanksgiving Day is a jewel, to set in the hearts of honest men; but be careful that you do not take the day, and leave out the gratitude.”—E.P. Powell
  19. “Reflect upon your present blessings.”—Charles Dickens
  20. “If you are really thankful, what do you do? You share. ”—W. Clement Stone
  21. “A thankful heart is not only the greatest virtue, but the parent of all the other virtues.” – Marcus Tullius Cicero
  22. “Now is no time to think of what you do not have. Think of what you can do with that there is.”—Ernest Hemingway
  23. “We would worry less if we praised more. Thanksgiving is the enemy of discontent and dissatisfaction.”—Harry A. Ironside
  24. “We tend to forget that happiness doesn’t come as a result of getting something we don’t have, but rather of recognizing and appreciating what we do have.”—Friedrich Koenig
  25. “Good mashed potato is one of the great luxuries in life.” — Lindsey Bareham
  26. “If a fellow isn’t thankful for what he’s got, he isn’t likely to be thankful for what he’s going to get.” — Frank A. Clark
  27. “Over and over I marvel at the blessings of my life: Each year has grown better than the last.”—Lawrence Welk
  28. “We should certainly count our blessings, but we should also make our blessings count.”—Neal A. Maxwell
  29. “Gratitude can turn a meal into a feast.”—Melody Beattie
  30. “When I started counting my blessings, my whole life turned around.”—Willie Nelson
  31. “Thanksgiving is one of my favorite days of the year because it reminds us to give thanks and to count our blessings. Suddenly, so many things become so little when we realize how blessed and lucky we are.” – Joyce Giraud
  32. “Gratitude, help us to see what is there instead of what isn’t.” — Annette Bridges
  33. “The turkey. The sweet potatoes. The stuffing. The pumpkin pie. Is there anything else we all can agree so vehemently about?” — Nora Ephron
  34. “There is no sincerer love than the love of food.”—George Bernard Shaw
  35. “I love Thanksgiving because it is a holiday centered around food and family, two things that are of utmost importance to me.” Marcus Samuelsson
  36. “What I love about Thanksgiving is that it’s purely about getting together with friends or family and enjoying food. It’s really for everybody, and it doesn’t matter where you’re from.”—Daniel Humm
  37. “The thankful heart will find, in every hour, some heavenly blessings.”—Henry Ward Beecher
  38. “Gratitude is the sign of noble souls.”—Aesop
  39. “There’s no happier person than a truly thankful, content person.”—Joyce Meyer
  40. “Let us be grateful to people who make us happy, they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.”—Marcel Proust
  41. “God gave you a gift of 86,400 seconds today. Have you used one to say ‘thank you?’”—William Arthur Ward
  42. “I’m thankful to be breathing, on this side of the grass. Whatever comes, comes.”—Ron Perlman
  43. “I do think that Thanksgiving is a very nice holiday because it’s all about saying thank you; it’s being thankful.”—Jacob Tremblay
  44. “A basic law: the more you practice the art of thankfulness, the more you have to be thankful for”—Norman Vincent Peale
  45. “I come from a family where gravy is considered a beverage.” – Erma Bombeck
  46. “Thankfulness is the quickest path to joy.” –  Jefferson Bethke
  47. “If the only prayer you ever say in your entire life is thank you, it will be enough.” – Meister Eckhart
  48. “Forever on Thanksgiving Day the heart will find the pathway home.” – Wilbur D. Nesbit
  49. “My fondest memories are generally the day after Thanksgiving. I get the total decorating Christmas itch.” – Katharine McPhee
  50. “What we’re really talking about is a wonderful day set aside on the fourth Thursday of November when no one diets. I mean, why else would they call it Thanksgiving?” – Erma Bombeck

Happy Thanksgiving!

Photo Prompts for November

Are you ready for November photo prompts? Grab your camera, snap some photos, print your favorites, frame, and hang on your wall.

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  1. Selfie
  2. Shadows
  3. Someone You Love
  4. Black and White
  5. Clouds
  6. Landscape
  7. Animals
  8. Bright Colors
  9. Friendship
  10. Weather
  11. Silhouette
  12. Water
  13. Morning Sky
  14. Travel
  15. Dusk
  16. Strangers
  17. Evening Sky
  18. Doorway
  19. Childhood Memory
  20. Inspirational
  21. Macro Photography
  22. Shapes
  23. Path
  24. Signs
  25. Happy Thanksgiving! Document your day.
  26. Home
  27. What you smile.
  28. Reflection
  29. Photographer’s Choice
  30. Holidays

Halloween Photography Tips for Lasting Memories

The old saying, “they grow up so fast” is true. Capturing childhood moments is essential for lasting memories. Halloween is one of those holidays, many children outgrow quickly. Do not let the opportunity go, take the time to photograph your children at Halloween.

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How to Get the Best Halloween Photos

1. Pre-Halloween Photo Shoot

Before Halloween, let your children try on their costumes.  Use this opportunity to plan a photo session.

  • Go to different places in your community to pose.
  • Use your child’s costume as a building block for finding the perfect place to pose. For example, Spiderman can easily pose on playground equipment.
  • Allow your child to get into character. Encourage impressions.

2. Be Patient

The big night is here, time for all the Halloween fun. Remember as you begin to take photos, be patient. Children are going to be excited about trick-or-treating or other Halloween events.

3. Document the Process from the Start

Do not wait until your children are dressed to take photos. Start snapping photos as soon as you begin to get ready for trick-or-treating. Often, the best photos come during the process of getting ready.

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4. Feature Props

Your photos need to include every part of your Halloween celebration.

  • If your child’s costume has props or special features, focus on them in a photo or two. The details always make the costumes.
  • Include decorations in your photos, your carved pumpkins or other yard decorations.
  • Take Halloween photos with your pets.
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5. Group Photo

Along with individual photos, get a group photo before trick-or-treating begins. Make sure to include yourself in one of the photos. Pose together before the sun goes down. Remember to use natural light to get the best photo. When you can, skip the flash.

6. Trick-or-Treating Photos

The main event is here.

  • Take numerous action photos of your children going from house to house. Avoid using flash.
  • Use streetlights or porch lights to add a glow effect.
  • Find a bright light to create silhouettes of your children in costume.  
  • Get photos from different angles.
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7. Last Photo of the Night

When returning home, get one last photo. Ask your children to show off their candy collection. Of course, some younger children may be asleep by the time you return home. Do not forget to get a photo. This is a perfect picture opportunity for the end of the night.

8. Get Creative with Editing

When editing photos, use special effects.

  • Use fog effect.
  • Convert to black and white photos.
  • Make certain colors stand out. Orange is a Halloween color. Turn photos of pumpkins black and white but keep the bright orange colors.
  • Use the soft-focus option to center on your children.

Happy Halloween! When out trick-or-treating, remember to have fun.

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